How Much Bleach Is Too Much For A Warrenton VA Septic System?

Your home’s septic system was built to last.  It’s probably one of the most rugged and durable systems you’ll ever own, but like all equipment, it needs regular maintenance in order to do its job efficiently and effectively.

Our recommendation is that you have your septic tank pumped out and have your system inspected every three to five years in order to ensure that it will provide you years of hassle- and headache-free service.

As the area’s top-rated septic service company, those are our two most in-demand services, and while we’re doing that work, we invariably spend time talking to our customers, and get a variety of questions.  One of the most common ones we get is: ‘how much bleach is too much for a Warrenton VA septic system?’

We love questions like that, because savvy homeowners ask great questions, which helps us help them.  At first glance, you might think the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Warrenton VA septic system?’ would be little to none at all.  After all, bleach and bacteria just don’t mix well.

The reality though is that while bleach in quantity is dangerous to the health of your septic tank, you’d have to pour a gallon or two straight down the drain before it would cause significant harm.  That’s good news, because many home cleaning products contain bleach, but the trace amounts that will wind up in your tank when you use them isn’t nearly enough to cause any damage.

Unfortunately, asking the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Warrenton VA septic system?’ may distract you from other potential dangers to your septic tank that are much more likely to be problematic.  Here are a few examples:

  • Excess Water – You might not think that water would be an issue. After all, your septic tank is tied to your home’s plumbing system, and it’s got water running to it all the time; literally every time you turn on the water faucet or flush a toilet.
    The real issue here is that the water flows into your tank and then straight into your drain field.  Having too much water in the drain field will supersaturate the soil, which makes it impossible for it to process wastes effectively.  Not good.
    The two most common ways that excess water makes its way into your drain field are:

    1. The downspouts connected to the rain gutters on the outside of your home. Make sure these are angled well away from the drain field and you won’t have a problem on this front.
    2. Leaky faucets or continually running toilets. You’d be amazed at how much water can enter your system via even a slow drip.  Any time you see or hear either of these, call a plumber and have them fixed right away to minimize the potential impact to your system.
  • Chemical Drain Cleaners – While the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Warrenton VA septic system?’ is measured in gallons, as little as a teaspoon of chemical drain cleaner can devastate the bacteria in your tank. These should be avoided at all costs.
  • Miscellaneous Solids – You’d be amazed at the variety of stuff that gets flushed down the toilet or sent down the drain of your kitchen sink. This is a broad catch-all category that includes everything from solid food waste to feminine hygiene products to anything your small children might flush down the toilet.  All of it winds up in your tank and most of it isn’t biodegradable, which means it will build up over time.  The only way to be rid of it is periodic tank pumping.
  • Grease – Most people know that pouring grease down the drain of your kitchen sink isn’t a good idea, but few people fully appreciate how big of a problem it can be. As with the miscellaneous solids we described above, some of the grease will stay in your tank where it will build up over time.  Another portion of it will leech into the drain field, float to the surface and harden, causing a problem called grease capping.  Both are major problems that can only be solved by having your tank pumped out periodically.
    You may have seen commercials on TV advertising products that promise to break up the grease and flush it from the system without having to resort to tank pumping.  Don’t believe the hype.  Not only do these products not work as advertised, some of them will cause serious harm to the bacterial colonies your tank needs to do its job.  In other words, many of these types of products can make a bad situation even worse.

Again, it’s not that the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Warrenton VA septic system?’ is a bad one, it’s just that asking it can distract you from other potential septic tank hazards that can do more damage, more quickly, which brings us back to the subject of maintenance.

How long has it been since you last had your septic tank pumped and your system inspected?  If you’re not sure, it’s probably been too long.  The good news is that there’s a simple solution.  Just give our office a call today and schedule your appointment.  We’d love to add you to our growing family of satisfied customers.

How Much Bleach Is Too Much For A Prince William County VA Septic System?

How much bleach is too much for a Prince William County VA septic system?  It’s a great question, and one we get on a regular basis from the clients we work with.  Since it’s come up more than once, we thought it would be a good topic to write an article about.  The answer might surprise you!

Your home’s septic system is probably the most rugged and robust piece of equipment you’ll ever own.  It was built to handle just about anything and to provide years of hassle-free service.  As rugged as it is though, it requires care and regular maintenance like everything else, and if you don’t take care of it, it won’t take care of you.

At first glance, you might think the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Prince William County VA septic system?’ is pretty close to zero.  After all, bleach kills bacteria, and your septic tank relies on bacteria to do its job.  It doesn’t seem like introducing one to the other would be a good idea.

Even worse, a lot of cleaning products contain bleach, which seems like a disaster waiting to happen.  The good news is that the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Prince William County VA septic system?’ is:  A lot more than you probably realize.

The reality is that small amounts of bleach aren’t going to do anything at all to your system.  You’d have to literally go to the store, buy a couple of gallon containers of the stuff and pour it straight down the drain before you introduced enough bleach to the tank to become problematic.  Don’t do that, and you’ll be just fine.

The catch, however is this: ‘How much bleach is too much for a Prince William County VA septic system?’ is the wrong question.

Asking that question diverts your attention to the subject of bleach, when there are a lot more things that are significantly more dangerous to your home’s septic system, and if you’re focused too intently on bleach, then odds are that you won’t pay enough attention to those other dangers.

So what kinds of things are we talking about?  Here are some examples:

  • Excess water – It might seem strange, given that water is a necessary component of a properly functioning septic system, but too much can cause problems. Excess water can be introduced in one of two ways:  If the downspouts connected to the rain gutters on your home are angled toward the drain field, or if you’ve got dripping faucets and toilets that run constantly.
    The problem is that the excess water will ultimately flow into your drain field.  Once there, it will supersaturate the ground and when that happens, your drain field won’t be able to percolate waste as efficiently, which will cause you no end of trouble.
  • Grease – Almost everyone knows it’s not a good idea to pour grease down the drain, but it happens more often than most people care to admit. Unfortunately, when it does, there’s really only one solution.  You’ve got to pump it out.
    You’ve probably seen late-night infomercials that promise to break it up so you can avoid that step, but don’t believe the hype.  Not only do these products not work, but as often as not, they’ll cause serious damage to the bacterial colonies your tank needs to perform its job well.  In other words, they wind up making the problem even worse than it was before.  Not good.
  • Chemical Drain Cleaners – While it takes up to two gallons of bleach to harm your tank’s bacteria, it only takes a teaspoon of chemical drain cleaner to do serious damage. These are to be avoided at all costs!

Again, it’s not that the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Prince William County VA septic system?’ is an inherently bad one, it’s just that it’s a distraction that tends to pull your attention away from other issues that are potentially much more harmful.

While we’re on the topic of your home’s septic system and things that can hurt it, let’s talk for a moment about maintenance.  Our recommendation is to have your septic tank pumped out and your system inspected every three to five years.

Doing both of those things at that interval will keep any potentially harmful materials from building up in your tank in sufficient quantity to cause problems, and having a trained professional put expert eyes on your system at regular intervals will give us the opportunity to spot problems while they’re still small.  All things being equal, small problems are much easier and less expensive to fix than big ones, which means that your septic system will provide you with years of hassle and headache-free service.

At the end of the day, that’s what everybody really wants, because dealing with serious septic problems that lead to a backflow of sewage into your home is a nightmare no one wants to experience.

If you can’t remember the last time your home septic system was inspected, or you had your tank pumped, it’s probably been too long.  We can help with that.  Give us a call and schedule your appointment today.  You’ll be very glad you did, and we can hardly wait for the opportunity to exceed your expectations!

How Much Bleach Is Too Much For A Nokesville VA Septic System?

Do you use bleach-based cleaners?  Odds are excellent that you do.  Many, if not most of the cleaners on the market today contain some level of bleach.  That leads many people to ask the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Nokesville VA septic system?’

After all, bleach is deadly to bacteria and your septic tank relies on bacteria to do its work.  In light of that, the question makes a lot of sense.

The good news is that the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Nokesville VA septic system?’ is a lot more than you might think.  You’d have to go to the store, buy a couple of gallons of bleach and pour it directly down the drain to do any serious harm to the bacteria living inside the tank.

Given that, you don’t need to worry in the least about those bleach-based cleaners.  They won’t introduce enough bleach to the system to cause any harm.

Unfortunately, asking the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Nokesville VA septic system?’ may prove to be problematic, not because there’s anything wrong with the question itself, but rather, because the question may distract you, drawing your attention away from other potential issues that could cause even greater damage to your home septic system.

Here are a few examples of what we’re talking about:

  • Grease – While most people know that it’s not a good idea to pour grease down the drain, it happens with surprising regularity. There are two big risks here.  First, some of the grease will remain in your tank, and the only way to get rid of it is to have your tank pumped out.
    Second, some of the grease will escape the tank, leeching into your drain field.  Once there, it will float to the surface and harden, creating a problem called grease capping, which will keep your drain field from processing waste effectively.
    You may have heard about products that claim to be able to dissolve the grease so that it flows out of the system safely and naturally.  Don’t believe the hype.  Not only do these products now work as advertised, but many of them will cause serious harm to the bacteria living in your tank.
  • Chemical Drain Cleaners – While the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Nokesville VA septic system?’ can be measured in gallons, it only takes about a teaspoon of chemical drain cleaner to devastate the bacteria in your tank. If you have a home septic system, unless you just want an expensive repair bill, these should never be used.
  • Excess Water In Your System – At first, this one might make you scratch your head. After all, your septic system is tied into your home’s plumbing, so it’s got water flowing through it all the time.  How can that be a bad thing?
    The problem is that too much water in your system will cause the soil in your drain field to become supersaturated.  When it reaches the point where it can’t absorb any more water, it will lose the ability to process waste.  Not good.
    Excess water can be introduced into the system in any number of ways, but there are two main culprits.  The first are the downspouts connected to your gutters.  Make sure these are angled well away from your drain field and they won’t be a problem.
    The second are your faucets and toilets.  If you have any slow drips, or toilets that run constantly, these can add a tremendous amount of water to your system.  As soon as you notice things like this, it’s important to call a plumber or break out your tools and fix the issue so it doesn’t potentially cause damage to your septic system.  The last thing you want is to face a situation where you suddenly have raw sewage backing up into your home!

Again, it’s not that the question itself, ‘how much bleach is too much for a Nokesville VA septic system?’ is a bad thing, it’s jut that in asking it, you run the risk of losing sight of some of the other issues that can cause serious damage to your system.

This, of course, brings us around to the topic of maintenance.

In the examples above, we mentioned having your tank pumped a couple of different times.  Our recommendation is to have that done every three to five years.  You should also have your system inspected in that same time interval, and in practice most of our customers have both done at the same time.

As the area’s top-rated septic service company, we offer both of those services and are happy to help make sure your septic system doesn’t give you any problems.

We’re a locally owned and operated company and we’ve been proudly serving the area for more than thirty years.  At this point, there’s not much our seasoned experts haven’t seen, so even if it’s been a while since you had your tank pumped out and your system inspected, we’ve got you covered.  Just give our office a call to schedule your appointment and we’ll make sure you’re taken care of.

We’ve built our reputation by exceeding the expectations of every customer we serve, and we’d love to add you to our growing family.  Give us a call today.

How Much Bleach Is Too Much For A Loudoun County VA Septic System?

How much bleach is too much for a Loudoun County VA septic system?  It’s a question we get from our customers on a regular basis, and it’s easy to understand the concern.  After all, many, if not most of the cleaning products on the market today contain bleach.  Since bleach is deadly to bacteria and your septic needs bacteria in order to do its job, it seems like a potentially devastating combination, and one to be avoided at all costs.

While it’s true that bleach kills bacteria, the reality is that it would take a significant quantity to do serious harm to the bacteria living in your septic tank.  You’d literally have to go to the store, buy a couple of gallons of the stuff and pour it straight down the drain.  As long as you avoid doing that, you’ll be just fine.

It’s not that the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Loudoun County VA septic system?’ is a bad one, it’s simply that there are other things that can potentially cause much greater harm to your home septic system and by focusing or worrying too much about bleach, your attention is drawn away from those other hazards.

What are those other potential hazards?  Here are a few examples:

Too Much Water In Your System

At first glance, this one almost seems counterintuitive.  After all, your plumbing system is connected to your septic tank and every time you turn on a faucet or flush a toilet, it’s got water flowing into it.  How can that be a bad thing?

The problem is that too much water will cause your drain field to become supersaturated.  When the ground gets too wet, your drain field can’t process wastes efficiently, which is bad news.  The two most common ways that excess water winds up in your drain field are as follows:

First, the downspouts connected to the rain gutters on your house could be contributing to the problem.  Check them and make sure they’re angled well away from your drain field.  That way, when it rains, you won’t have to worry that they’re contributing to the problem.

Second, dripping faucets and constantly running toilets.  You’d be amazed at how much water these things can introduce to your home’s septic system.  The moment you see them, give your local plumber a call and nip them in the bud.

Chemical Drain Cleaners

While the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Loudoun County VA septic system?’ is measured in gallons, it takes as little as a teaspoon of chemical drain cleaner to devastate the bacteria in your tank.  These should be avoided at all costs.  They’ll do much more harm than good.

Grease

Most people know that pouring grease down the kitchen sink is a bad idea, but it’s something that happens on a regular basis anyway.  Here, the problem is two-fold:

Some of the grease gets stuck in the tank, leaving less room for solid waste processing.  The only way to get rid of it is to have your tank pumped out at regular intervals.

Another portion of it will escape the tank and leech into your drain field.  Once there, it will float to the surface and harden, creating a problem known as grease capping, which prevents your drain field from processing waste effectively.  Both of these problems are bad news.

You may have seen late night infomercials selling products that promise to dissolve the grease and get rid of it without having to resort to tank pumping or a repair of your drain field.  Don’t believe the hype.  Not only do these products not work as advertised, many of them can cause serious harm to the bacteria in your tank.

Miscellaneous Solids

A surprising variety of stuff winds up in your tank, especially if you have small children, who seem to delight in watching odds and ends flush down the toilet.  Most of this stuff isn’t biodegradable, and gets stuck in the tank, which is yet another reason to have it pumped out at regular intervals.

Again, it’s not that the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Loudoun County VA septic system?’ is a bad one, it’s simply that by spending too much time focused on, or worried about bleach, it will cause you to lose sight of the other potential dangers your septic system faces.

We’ve mentioned having our tank pumped a few times in the examples above.  Our recommendation is that you have the tank pumped and your system inspected every three to five years.  Doing so will give us an opportunity to put expert eyes on your system at regular intervals, which enables us to spot problems while they’re still small and easy/inexpensive to repair.  That’s a big win for you and gives you tremendous peace of mind.

Your home septic system is incredibly robust and durable, but like any system, it needs regular maintenance in order to provide you with hassle- and headache-free service.  As the area’s top rated septic service company, we can help with that.

If you’re not sure how long its been since you had your system looked at, it’s probably overdue.  Just give our office a call and schedule your appointment today.  We can hardly wait for the opportunity to exceed your expectations!

How Much Bleach Is Too Much For A Leesburg VA Septic System?

We get a lot of questions from our clients.  One of the more common ones is, ‘how much bleach is too much for a Leesburg VA septic system?’  It’s a great question, so we decided to turn the answer into an article this month.

At first blush, the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Leesburg VA septic system?’ would appear to be as little as possible.  After all, bleach kills bacteria on contact.  Your trusty septic tank relies on bacteria to do its job, so mixing the two would seem to be a disaster waiting to happen.

The reality though, is that bleach isn’t nearly as harmful as you might think.  In fact, you’d have to buy a couple gallons of the stuff and pour it straight down the drain in order to do serious harm to your tank.  As long as you don’t do something like that, you’ll be just fine.

That’s good news, because it means you don’t have to selectively shop to try and avoid bleach-based cleaning products.  The small amounts of bleach you’ll introduce to the system by using them won’t be nearly enough to cause any harm.

Unfortunately, although the question, ‘how much bleach is too much for a Leesburg VA septic system?’ is a good one, spending too much time worrying over it or obsessing about it can pull your attention away from other dangers that are much more hazardous to your home’s septic system.

As hardy and robust as your septic tank is, there are things that can cause it serious harm, and much more easily than bleach can.  Here are a few:

  • Grease – Just about everyone knows that it’s not a good idea to pour grease down the drain, but unfortunately, it happens more often than most people will admit. The problem is that the grease winds up in your tank.
    Some of it will stay there and build up over time, and some of it will escape into your drain field.  Both are major problems, and the only way to keep it from happening is to have your tank pumped out at regular intervals.
    You’ve probably seen late night infomercials advertising products that promise to break up the grease and remove it from your tank quickly and painlessly.  Don’t believe it.  Those products don’t work, and worse, many of them will harm the bacterial colonies your tank relies on to do its work.
  • Chemical Drain Cleaners – While the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Leesburg VA septic system?’ is measured in gallons, as little as a teaspoon of chemical drain cleaner can devastate the bacteria in your tank. These should be avoided at all costs.
  • Excess Water – This one is a head-scratcher for many people. After all, your septic system is tied to your home’s plumbing, so at first glance, it would seem that water shouldn’t be an issue.
    The problem here is that too much water supersaturates the soil in your drain field, which makes it process waste much less slowly.
    Excess water can find its way into your drain field by one of two roads.  Shutting both down is vitally important.  First, check the downspouts attached to the gutters on your house to make sure they’re angled well away from your drain field.  Second, any time you spot a dripping faucet or a toilet that won’t stop running, nip it in the bud as quickly as possible.

Again, it’s not that the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Leesburg VA septic system?’ is a bad one.  Just don’t let it pull your attention from the dangers we outlined above, because these things can do significant harm much more easily than bleach.

The best way to minimize risk to your home septic system is proper maintenance.  Here, we have two recommendations:  One, have your tank pumped out at regular intervals, and two, have your system inspected often.

We recommend having both done every three to five years, and we offer both services at reasonable rates.  The biggest advantage of regular maintenance is that it allows us to put expert eyes on your system, which in turn, allows us to spot problems while they’re still small.

All things being equal, small problems are much easier and cheaper to fix than big ones are.  That’s a big win for you, and gives you tremendous peace of mind, because the last thing in the world you want to deal with is a major problem with your septic system that results in the backflow of raw sewage inside your home.  If you’ve never had to deal with that situation before, count yourself lucky.  If you have, you know how much of a nightmare it can be.

You don’t want to trust the integrity of your home septic system to just anyone.  You want the best, and in this area, that’s us.  In the more than thirty years we’ve been in the business, we’ve grown to become the area’s top-rated septic service company, which is why so many of your friends and neighbors rely on us.

If you’re not sure when the last time your tank was pumped, or your system was inspected, it’s probably well past time.  Give us a call today to schedule your appointment.  You’ll be very glad you did.

How Much Bleach Is Too Much For A Gainesville VA Septic System?

How long has it been since you last had your septic tank pumped and had your system inspected?  If you can’t recall the date, it’s probably well past time, and we can help with that.  We’ve been proudly serving the region for more than thirty years, and in that time, have grown to become the area’s top-rated, most respected septic tank service company.

Your home’s septic system is one of the most rugged and robust systems you’ll ever own, but like all systems, it requires routine maintenance in order to do its job well and effectively.  We recommend having your tank pumped and your system inspected every three to five years.

Doing so will enable us to send one of our experts out to put eyes on your system at regular intervals, which will enable us to catch problems while they’re still small and both easy and inexpensive to repair.  That saves you money and gives you tremendous peace of mind.

If you’ve never experienced a backflow of raw sewage into your home, count your blessings.  If you have, you know what a nightmare it can be, which is why routine maintenance is so important, and why those services are among the most widely used that we offer.

One question we get quite frequently from the customers we serve is ‘how much bleach is too much for a Gainesville VA septic system?’

It’s easy to see where that question comes from.  After all, many popular cleaning products are bleach-based, and on the face of it, bleach seems like it would be devastating to your tank.  Bleach kills bacteria, and your septic tank needs bacteria to do its work.  It seems like a bad combination.

You might be surprised then, to learn that the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Gainesville VA septic system?’ is a lot more than you think.  You’d have to pour up to two gallons of bleach straight down the drain for it to do significant damage.  As long as you avoid that, you’ll be just fine, which means you can keep right on using those bleach-based cleaners.  They won’t introduce enough bleach to cause any damage.

The thing is though, asking the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Gainesville VA septic system?’ can be a bit of a distraction.  By that we mean that if you spend too much time worried about or obsessing over bleach, you might ignore other hazards that are potentially much more damaging to your septic tank.  Here are a few examples of what we’re talking about:

Too Much Water In The System

At first blush, this one might leave you puzzled.  After all, you’ve got water flowing into your septic system every time you flush a toilet or turn on a faucet, so how can too much water be a bad thing?

The answer lies in your drain field.  When your drain field gets too much water in it, the ground gets supersaturated.  When it reaches the point where it can’t absorb any more water, it can’t percolate, which means it can’t process waste.

There are two main culprits here.  The first are the downspouts connected to the gutters on the outside of your home.  Check them and be sure they’re angled well away from your drain field, and you’ll eliminate this as a potential problem.

The second takes the form of dripping faucets or toilets that run constantly.  You’d be amazed at how much water even a slow drip can introduce to your system.  As soon as you see problems like this, call your plumber or break out your tools and fix them right away.

Chemical Drain Cleaners

While the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Gainesville VA septic system?’ is an amount measured in gallons, as little as a teaspoon of chemical drain cleaner can utterly devastate your tank’s bacteria.  Avoid these like the plague and save yourself the headache and expense.

Grease

Most people know that pouring grease down the drain is a bad idea, but few know the exact reason why.  It’s problematic in two ways.  First, some of the grease will remain in the tank, where it will slowly build up over time until you have the tank pumped out.  Less room in the tank means less efficiency in terms of waste processing.

Second, some of the grease will leech out into the drain field, where it will float to the surface and harden, creating a problem known as grease capping.  This prevents your drain field from processing waste effectively.  Both are potentially ruinous problems.

Note that grease isn’t thing you can pour down the drain or flush down the toilet that can cause you problems.  Basically, anything that’s not biodegradable shouldn’t be flushed or sent down the drain because it’ll just build up in the tank over time.

Again, it’s not that asking the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Gainesville VA septic system?’ is a bad idea, it’s just that doing so runs the risk of diverting your attention away from other potential issues that could be every bit as harmful, if not more harmful to the integrity of your septic system.

In any case, we can help ensure that your system gives you years of headache- and hassle-free service.  Give us a call today.

How Much Bleach Is Too Much For A Fairfax VA Septic System?

When was the last time you had your septic tank pumped out and your system inspected?  If you can’t remember the date, it’s probably been too long.  Our recommendation is to have both done every three to five years.  Doing so gives us the opportunity to put expert eyes on your system at regular intervals, which will allow us to catch problems while they’re still small.

All else being equal, small problems are less expensive to repair than big ones, which saves you money and gives you tremendous peace of mind.  If you’ve never had to deal with the horror of raw sewage backing up into your home, count yourself lucky.  If you have, then you know what a nightmare it can be.  Regular maintenance can help you avoid all that.

As the #1 septic service company in the area, we offer both of those services, and while we’re doing our work, we talk with our customers and get a lot of questions.  One of the most common ones we get is some variation of: ‘How much bleach is too much for a Fairfax VA septic system?’

It’s easy to see where this question comes from.  After all, most household cleaners have bleach in them, and invariably, some of that bleach winds up going down the drain or being flushed down the toilet, where it winds up in your septic tank.

That sounds like a disaster waiting to happen.  After all, bleach is lethal to bacteria, and your tank needs a healthy colony of bacteria to do its work.

The good news is, the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Fairfax VA septic system?’ is a lot more than you might think.  You would literally have to go out and buy a couple of gallons of bleach and pour it down the drain before it did serious harm to your septic system, so those cleaning products you use aren’t going to cause any trouble.  Just avoid pouring it in bulk down the drain and you’ll be fine.

Unfortunately, the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Fairfax VA septic system?,’ tends to draw your attention away from other potential hazards and as durable as your septic system is, it’s not immune to harm.  Here are a few of the dangers you may not have considered:

Grease

Most people know it’s not a good idea to pour grease down the drain, but few understand precisely why it’s bad.  There are two reasons:

First, some of that grease will stay in your tank, building up over time.  Unfortunately, the only way to get rid of it is to have the tank pumped out.  Second, some of it will escape, leeching into your drain field where it will float to the surface and harden, creating a problem called grease capping, which prevents your drain field from processing waste effectively.  Both are potentially major problems.

You’ve probably seen products advertised on TV that promise to dissolve the grease so you can avoid having the tank pumped out.  Don’t believe it.  Not only do these products not work as the advertising promises, but many of them will damage the colonies of bacteria living inside your tank, making a bad problem even worse.

Miscellaneous Solids

This is a broad, catch-all category.  You’d be amazed at how much random stuff winds up in your septic tank, especially if you have small children, who seem to delight in flushing small objects down the toilet to watch them disappear like magic.

Many of these objects aren’t biodegradable, and will get hung up in your tank where they’ll build up over time.  As before, the only way to get them out is to have your tank pumped at regular intervals.

Chemical Drain Cleaners

While the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Fairfax VA septic system?’ is measured in gallons, it only takes a tiny amount of chemical drain cleaner to cause significant harm.  Depending on the chemical drain cleaner in question, as little as a teaspoon will devastate the bacteria living in your tank.  No matter how tempting it might seem, avoid these like the plague.

An Excess of Water

This one might cause you to scratch your head.  After all, every time you flush a toilet or turn on a faucet you’ve got water flowing into your septic system, so how can that be a bad thing?

The problem here is that too much water will cause your drain field to become supersaturated.  In that state, it’s unable to process wastes effectively because they can’t percolate into the already water-laden ground.

There are two primary sources of excess water.  One is from the downspouts connected to the gutters on the outside of your house.  Check them to make sure they’re angled well away from your drain field and you won’t have a problem on that front.

The second potential problem areas are your faucets and toilets.  You’d be amazed at how much water a slow drip or a constantly running toilet can introduce to the drain field.  Fix these the moment you spot them to minimize their impact.

Again, it’s not that the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Fairfax VA septic system?’ is a bad one, it’s simply that asking it may divert your attention away from other potential hazards.

In any event, if you’re having problems with your system, or if you’re not sure how long it’s been since you last had your tank pumped out and inspected, give us a call today.  We’ll be there when you need us.

How Much Bleach Is Too Much For A Clifton VA Septic System?

How long has it been since you had your septic tank pumped out and your system inspected?  If you can’t recall the date, it’s probably time.  Your home’s septic system is remarkably robust, but like everything else, if it doesn’t get proper maintenance, it’s going to give you trouble.

We recommend having the tank pumped out and having your system inspected every three to five years.  As the region’s #1 septic service company, we provide both of those services.

Often, while we’re doing our work, we get questions from the customers we’re serving.  One of the more common ones we get is ‘how much bleach is too much for a Clifton VA septic system?’  It’s easy to see where the question comes from.  After all, most household cleaning products are bleach-based, and some of that bleach winds up going down the drain and making its way into your septic tank.

Bleach is lethal to bacteria, and your tank relies on bacteria to do its work, so at first glance, it seems like it would be a disaster waiting to happen.

The good news though, is that the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Clifton VA septic system?’ is a lot more than you might think.  You’d have to pour a couple of gallons of bleach down the drain in order to do significant damage to the tank’s bacteria.  As long as you avoid doing that, you’ll be just fine, which means that you can keep right on using those bleach-based cleaners.

One thing to be mindful of is this:  While there’s certainly nothing wrong with asking the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Clifton VA septic system?,’ there is a potential danger that by focusing on it too much, it will divert attention away from other potential hazards that could do a lot more harm to your tank than nominal amounts of bleach.  Here are a few examples of other potential issues that could be even more problematic:

Excess Water

Since your septic tank is connected to your home’s plumbing system, you may be wondering how and why too much water could be a bad thing.  After all, there’s water flowing into the tank all the time, right?

Yes, but too much water can still be a bad thing.  Here’s why:  Excess water winds up in your drain field.  Soil can only absorb so much water, so quickly.  When it reaches the point of supersaturation, your drain field can’t process waste.

Excess water can enter the drain field by two main roads.  The first are the downspouts connected to your home’s rain gutters.  Do a quick check of these and make sure they’re pointed well away from the drain field and they won’t contribute to the problem.

The second major culprit are dripping faucets and constantly running toilets.  Even a slow drip can add a shocking amount of water to the system over a twenty-four hour period.  As soon as you notice things like this, it’s time to break out your tools or contact a local plumber to nip it in the bud.

Chemical Drain Cleaners

While the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Clifton VA septic system?’ is measured in gallons, tiny amounts of chemical drain cleaners, sometimes as little as a single teaspoon, can devastate the bacteria living in your tank.  No bacteria, no waste processing.  Avoid chemical drain cleaners at all costs.

Grease

Grease is problematic for two reasons.  One, when you pour it down the drain, some of it is going to remain in the tank, interfering with its normal function until you pump it out.  Second, some of it is going to leech out into your drain field.

Once there, it will float to the surface and harden, creating a problem known as grease capping and preventing your drain field from processing wastes effectively.

You may have seen or heard about products that promise they can dissolve the grease in your tank, allowing it to pass harmlessly into the drain field.  Don’t believe it – it’s marketing hype.  Not only do these products not work as advertised, some of them can seriously damage the bacteria your tank needs to do its job well, which makes an already bad problem even worse.

Other Solids

If you have small children, all sorts of things can wind up in your septic tank, because kids have a fascination with flushing stuff to watch it disappear down the drain.  Even if you don’t, over time, a variety of objects can wind up in your septic tank and unless they’re biodegradable, and many aren’t, they’ll remain there until you have it pumped out.

Again, it’s not that the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Clifton VA septic system?’ is problematic – just that you don’t want to let it consume you to the point that you don’t pay a sufficient amount of attention to the issues we outlined above.

All of that brings us back around to the topic of maintenance.  If it’s been a while since your home septic system has had any, give us a call and schedule your appointment today.  We’ve been proudly serving the region for more than thirty years, and we’d love to add you to our growing family of satisfied customers!

How Much Bleach Is Too Much For A Catlett VA Septic System?

How long has it been since you had your septic system inspected or your tank pumped out?  If you aren’t sure, then chances are that it’s well past time.  We recommend having both services performed at 3-5 year intervals.  That will keep the amount of non-biodegradable materials in your tank to a minimum and give our experts regular opportunities to spot problems with your system while they’re still small.

All things being equal, small problems are much cheaper and easier to fix than big ones, and most big problems with your septic system only end one way:  With a backflow of raw sewage inside your home.  If you’ve never had to deal with that kind of issue, count yourself lucky.  If you have, you know what a nightmare it can be.

We can help make sure you never have to worry about that.  As the #1 septic service company in the area, and with more than three decades of experience under our belts, there’s not much our talented crew hasn’t seen at this point.  Even if it’s been a while since your tank had any TLC, we’ve got you covered.

We get asked a lot of questions while we’re pumping and inspecting tanks for our clients, with one of the most common questions being ‘how much bleach is too much for a Catlett VA septic system?’

It’s easy to see why there’s a concern and where the question comes from.  After all, many household cleaning products have bleach in them, and bleach doesn’t play nicely with bacteria.  Since your septic system needs a thriving colony of bacteria to do its work, it’s a fair question.

Fortunately, the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Catlett VA septic system?’ is a lot more than you might think.

Don’t worry, those bleach-based cleaners won’t cause any problems for your home septic system.  In fact, you’d have to pour as much as two gallons of bleach straight down the drain for it to have a serious impact.

While there’s certainly nothing wrong with asking the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Catlett VA septic system?,’ the danger is that by focusing on bleach and the potential damage it could cause, it takes your attention away from other hazards which are even more detrimental to your system.

Here are a few of the threats we’re talking about:

Excess Water In Your System

This one might leave you puzzled.  After all, your septic tank is hooked into your home’s plumbing system, and it’s got water flowing into it all the time, so how could adding a bit more water be damaging?

Too much of a good thing is a bad thing, specifically where your drain field is concerned.  The drain field processes wastes by a process called percolation.  When there’s too much water in the field though, the soil becomes supersaturated and it can’t percolate.  No percolation = no waste processing, and you’re an unhappy home owner.

The two biggest causes where excess water are concerned are the downspouts connected to your gutters and dripping faucets/constantly running toilets.

Thankfully, both are easy to fix.

Where the downspouts are concerned, just make sure they’re angled well away from your drain field and they won’t give you any trouble.

Where the faucets and toilets are concerned, the moment you see a drip, or hear a toilet running, diagnose the issue and fix it if you can.  If it’s beyond your level of expertise, call your local plumber and nip it in the bud to minimize its impact on your septic system and drain field.

Chemical Drain Cleaners

While the answer to the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Catlett VA septic system?’ is measured in gallons, it takes much smaller amounts of chemical drain cleaner to do serious harm to your system.  In some cases, no more than a teaspoon is required to devastate the bacteria in your tank.  Avoid chemical drain cleaners at all costs!

Grease

Most people know that pouring grease down the drain is a bad idea, but you’d be surprised at how often it happens.  It’s bad news for your system in two ways:

First, some portion of the grease will get trapped in your tank and remain there until you pump it out, interfering with the tank’s normal operation.

Second, some portion will escape, leeching into your drain field where it will float to the surface and harden, in a phenomenon known as grease capping.  When this happens, your drain field isn’t able to process wastes effectively.

You’ve almost certainly seen at least a few late-night infomercials selling products that promise to safely dissolve the grease in your tank so it can flow out of the system.  Don’t believe it.  Not only do these products not work as advertised, but many of them will devastate your tank bacteria, making a bad problem even worse.

Again, it’s certainly not the case that asking the question ‘how much bleach is too much for a Catlett VA septic system?’ is a bad thing – just be mindful that while bleach isn’t a big problem unless you dump a lot of it down the drain, the issues we described above can have a much greater impact, so don’t lose sight of those!

In any case, if you even think you might be having a problem with your home septic system.  Help is just a phone call away.  Give us a call today.  We’ll be there when you need us.

What Are The Signs That Your Warrenton, VA, Septic Tank Is Full?

Septic tanks are reliable and remarkably trouble-free when they are kept in good repair. One of the most important aspects of septic maintenance is regular pumping to keep it clear. But what are the signs that your Warrenton, VA, septic tank is full?

The experts here at SES say the best approach is to arrange scheduled pumping. This might mean annually, or once every two or three years, depending on how many people live at your house and are using your system.

But there are also certain indicators that will let you know it is time for a clean out. SES has come up with a list of 5 signs that it’s time to schedule a tank pumping, 2 indoors and 3 outdoors.

The most obvious is a sewer backup in your home. This type of thing is so gross, so messy, so smelly, and so unsanitary that is impossible to miss. It usually starts in the basement around a floor drain or as part of the plumbing. Then it shows up on upper floors in the bathroom, and in sinks and tubs. This situation makes the house unhealthy for you and your family. Call SES immediately to arrange for the septic tank to be cleaned out.

Are you continually buying products and tools to help get rid of clogs, but they don’t work? That’s one of the signs that your Warrenton, VA, septic tank is full. Get your tank emptied out, which deals with the actual source of the problem. Your drains will start to run efficiently again.

Outside, check for bad odors around your drain field. When your tank is over capacity, wastewater gets pushed out into the soil. The gray water from sinks, tubs and dishwashers combines with black water from toilets. And it doesn’t smell good! Clean out your tank and the problem will disappear.

Another sign outside is grass that is noticeably healthier than the lawn in the rest of your yard. It means wastewater is spilling out into the soil and fertilizing the grass over the tank. The cause is either a tank too full or a leak. A technician can pump the tank and check for leaks on the same visit.

The third sign you might notice in your drain field is the presence of puddles even when it hasn’t rained. This is wastewater that leaches out of a tank that is too full. Get it pumped out and your puddles will disappear.

SES has been helping the local community since 1987. We can help with all aspects of septic systems, including:

  • Pumping
  • Design
  • Installation
  • Repair
  • Maintenance

Call SES today to find out the signs that your Warrenton, VA, septic tank is full and to schedule a clean out.